HAMP 2nd Lien Modification Program (2MP)

June 16, 2010

 

***UPDATE:  Click HERE to view a 30-minute self-guided tutorial that provides an overview of the Second Lien Modification Program (2MP) for servicers of non-Government Sponsored Entities (GSE) loans.***

Note: If you are having a problem accessing the tutorial, email me at lauren@lossmitigationmasters.com

Many homeowners may be struggling to make their monthly mortgage payments because they have a second lien.  Even when a first mortgage payment is affordable, the addition of a second lien can sometimes increase monthly payments beyond affordable levels.  Second liens often complicate or prevent modification or refinancing of a first mortgage.

The 2nd Lien Modification Program (2MP) offers homeowners a way to lower payments on their second mortgage.  2MP offers homeowners, their mortgage servicers, and investors an incentive for modifying a second lien.  Servicers and investors may also receive an incentive for extinguishing a second lien, forgiving all of the debt a homeowner owes.

Homeowners must provide consent to share their first lien mortgage modification information with their second lien mortgage servicer, if they are different. Since 2MP is meant to be complementary to the Home Affordable Modification Program (HAMP), a homeowner must have their first lien modified through HAMP before the second lien can be modified under 2MP.

Under 2MP, with their investor’s guidance, a mortgage servicer may:

  • Reduce the interest rate to 1% for second liens that pay both principal and interest (amortizing)
  • Reduce the interest rate to 1% amortizing or 2% interest-only for interest-only second liens
  • Extend the term of the second lien to 40 years
  • If the principal was deferred (through forbearance) or forgiven on the first lien, a servicer must forbear the same proportion on the second lien; although a servicer may, in its discretion, forgive any portion or all of the second lien and receive incentives for doing so

A second lien is eligible for 2MP if:

  • the corresponding first lien has been modified under the Obama Administration’s HAMP and the second lien servicer is participating
  • it was originated on or before January 1, 2009
  • it does not have an unpaid principal balance (at consideration for the modification) of less than $5,000 or a pre-modification scheduled monthly payment of less than $100
  • it has not yet been modified under 2MP
  • it is not subordinate to a second lien or is not a home equity loan in first lien position
  • it is not a second lien on which no interest is charged and no payments are due until the first lien is paid in full
  • the second lien servicer is in possession of a fully executed 2MP modification agreement or trial period plan by December 31, 2012; or the second lien is not insured, guaranteed, or held by a Federal government agency (e.g. FHA, HUD, VA, and Rural Development)

Examples

Family A: Amortizing Second Mortgage

In 2006: Family A took out a 30-year closed-end second mortgage with a balance of $45,000 and an interest rate of 8.6%.

Today: Family A has an unpaid balance of almost $44,000 on their second mortgage.

Under the 2MP: The interest rate on Family A’s second mortgage will be reduced to 1% for 5 years. This will reduce their annual payments by over $2,300.

After those five years, Family A’s mortgage payment will rise again but to a more moderate level.

                                                 Existing Mortgage Loan Modification
Balance $43,942 $43,942
Remaining Years 27 27
Interest Rate 8.6% 1.0%
Monthly Payment $349.48 $154.81
Savings $195 per month, $2,336 per year for five years

Family B: Interest-Only Second Mortgage

In 2006: Family B took out an interest-only second mortgage with a balance of $60,000, an interest rate of 4.4%, and a term of 15 years.

Today: Family B has $60,000 remaining on their interest-only second mortgage because none of the principal was paid down.

Under the 2MP: The interest rate on Family B’s interest-only second mortgage will be reduced to 2% for 5 years. This will reduce their annual interest payments by $1,440.

After those five years, Family B’s mortgage payment will adjust back up and the mortgage will amortize over a term equal to the longer of (i) the remaining term of the family’s modified first mortgage (e.g. 27 years if the first mortgage had a 30 year term at origination and was three years old at the time of modification) or (ii) the originally scheduled amortization term of the second mortgage.

                                                Existing Mortgage Loan Modification
Balance $60,000 $60,000
Remaining Years 12 27 (term reset to the remaining term of the modified first loan)
Interest Rate 4.4% 2.0%
Monthly Interest Payments $220 $100
Savings $120 per month, $1,440 per year for five years

List of Participating Servicers

  • Bank of America (including Countrywide)
  • Citi Mortgage, Inc.
  • Chase (including EMC and WaMu)
  • Wells Fargo (including Wachovia)
  • BayView Loan Servicing, LLC
  • Servis One dba BSI Financial Services
  • iServe Servicing, Inc.

More servicers will be added in the near future as they join the program.

For more information, contact your mortgage servicer.


Fannie Mae Relaxes Waiting Period for Buying a New Home After a Short Sale

May 3, 2010

 

In Announcement SEL-2010-05, Fannie Mae updated several policies regarding the future eligibility of borrowers to obtain a new mortgage loan after experiencing a preforeclosure event (preforeclosure sale, short sale, or deed-in-lieu of foreclosure).

The “waiting period” – the amount of time that must elapse after the preforeclosure event – is changing and may be dependent on the loan-to-value (LTV) ratio for the transaction and whether extenuating circumstances contributed to the borrower’s financial hardship (for example, loss of employment). In addition, Fannie Mae is updating the requirements for determining that borrowers have re-established their credit after a significant derogatory credit event.

***Note:  The terms “short sale” and “preforeclosure sale” both referenced in the Announcement have the same meaning – the sale of a property in lieu of a foreclosure, resulting in a payoff of less than the total amount owed, which was pre-approved by the servicer.***

Waiting Period After a Preforeclosure Sale, Short Sale, or Deed-in-Lieu of Foreclosure

Fannie Mae is changing the required waiting period for a borrower to be eligible for a mortgage loan after a preforeclosure event. The waiting period commences on the completion date of the preforeclosure event, and may vary based on the maximum allowable LTV ratios.

Preforeclosure Event Current Waiting Period Requirements New Waiting Period Requirements(1)
 Deed-in-Lieu of Foreclosure 4 years  2 years – 80% maximum LTV ratios,  4 years – 90% maximum LTV ratios,  7 years – LTV ratios per the Eligibility Matrix
 Short Sale  2 years

 

Exceptions to Waiting Period for Extenuating Circumstances
Preforeclosure Event Current Waiting Period Requirements New Waiting Period Requirements (1)
 Deed-in-Lieu of Foreclosure 2 years      Additional requirements apply after 2 years up to 7 years  2 years – 90% maximum LTV ratios
 Short Sale  No exceptions are permitted to the 2-year waiting period

 (1) The maximum LTV ratios permitted are the lesser of the LTV ratios in this table or the maximum LTV ratios for the transaction per the Eligibility Matrix.

Bankruptcies

The multiple bankruptcy policy is being clarified to state that 2 or more borrowers with individual bankruptcies are not cumulative. For example, if the borrower has one bankruptcy and the co-borrower has one bankruptcy, this is not considered a multiple bankruptcy. The current waiting periods for bankruptcies remain unchanged.

Effective Date

This policy is effective for beginning July 1, 2010.

Requirements for Re-Establishing Credit

The requirements for borrowers to re-establish their credit after a significant derogatory event are also being updated. Fannie Mae is replacing the requirements related to the number of credit references and applicable payment histories with the waiting periods and other criteria.

After a bankruptcy, foreclosure, deed-in-lieu of foreclosure, or preforeclosure or short sale, the borrower’s credit will be considered re-established if all of the following are met:

  • The waiting period and the related requirements are met.
  • The loan meets the minimum credit score requirements based on the parameters of the loan and the established eligibility requirements.

The “Catch”?

Now to qualify after that 2 year period, the new regulations state that a minimum 20% down payment will be required; 10% for a down payment, the wait will revert to the 4 year minimum; less than 10% for a down payment, the wait could be even longer — UNLESS there are “extenuating circumstances” such as job loss, health problems, divorce, etc…

But doesn’t pretty much any short sale by default involve “extenuating circumstances”? Just show them the hardship letter you submitted with your short sale docs. Case closed.

Why This Matters?

So why does this matter, and how should you, as distressed homeowners, USE this information?

Well for starters, if you couple this with the Obama administration’s new short sale assistance program (where mortgage servicing companies are paid $1,000 to handle successful short sales and mortgage holders get $1,500 for signing over their property), you’ve now got more compelling reasons than ever to pursue a short sale rather than just throwing up your hands and “letting things go”.


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