BREAKING NEWS: FHA Suspends 90-Day Anti-Flipping Rule for 1 Year

January 19, 2010

Effective February 1, 2010, the Federal Housing Administration (FHA) will place a one-year moratorium on its 90-day anti-flipping rule under waiver of  requirements of 24 CFR 203.37a(b)(2). , unless otherwise extended or withdrawn by the Commissioner. This will allow buyers with FHA-backed loans to buy homes that have been held for less than 90 days.

“FHA borrowers, because of the restrictions we are now lifting, have often been shut out from buying affordable properties, ” said FHA Commissioner David H. Stevens. “This action will enable our borrowers, especially first-time buyers, to take advantage of this opportunity.”

The waiver is limited to those sales meeting the following conditions:

  1. All transactions must be arms-length, with no interest between the seller and the buyer or any other parties involved in the sales transaction.
  2. The seller holds title to the property.
  3. LLCs, corporations, or trusts that are serving as sellers were established and operated in accordance with state and Federal laws.
  4. No pattern of previous flipping exists for the property, as shown by multiple title transfers within the last 12 months.
  5. The property was marketed openly and fairly.
  6. Assignment of a contract for sale will trigger a red flag.

In cases where the sales price is 20% or more over and above the seller’s acquisition cost, the waiver will only apply if the lender:

  1. Justifies the increase in value by retaining supporting documentation and/or a second appraisal which verifies the seller has completed legitimate renovation, repair, and rehabilitation to substantiate  the increase in value, or in cases where no work is performed, the appraiser provides sufficient explanation of the increase in value.
  2. Orders a property inspection and provides the inspection report to the purchaser before closing. The lender may charge the borrower for this inspection. The use of FHA-approved inspectors is not required.
  3. At a minimum, the inspection must include: the property structure, including: the foundation, floor, ceiling, walls and roof. The exterior, including: the siding, doors, windows, decks, balconies, walkways, and driveways. All interiors and all insulation and ventilation systems, fireplaces, and fuel-burning appliances.
  4. The waiver is limited to forward mortgages and does not apply to Home Equity Conversion Mortgage (HECM) for Purchase program.

Findings

FHA finds that eliminating the 90-day resale restriction for buyers will permit buyers to use FHA-insured funding to purchase other bank-owned properties, or properties sold through private resale, which will allow homes to resell as quickly as possible.


Understanding the Terms Used in Foreclosure

May 1, 2009

 

If you are working with your lender to keep your home, known as retention, there are several options:

  • Reinstatement: Your lender may agree to let you pay the total amount you are behind, in a lump sum payment and by a specific date. This is often combined with forbearance when you can show that funds from a bonus, tax refund, or other source will become available at a specific time in the future. Be aware that there may be late fees and other costs associated with a reinstatement plan.
  • Forbearance: Your lender may offer a temporary reduction or suspension of your mortgage payments while you get back on your feet. Forbearance is often combined with a reinstatement or a repayment plan to pay off the missed or reduced mortgage payments.
  • Repayment Plan: This is an agreement that gives you a fixed amount of time to repay the amount you are behind by combining a portion of what is past due with your regular monthly payment. At the end of the repayment period you have gradually paid back the amount of your mortgage that was delinquent.
  • Loan Modification: This is a written agreement between you and your mortgage company that permanently changes one or more of the original terms of your note to make the payments more affordable.

If you and your lender agree that you cannot keep your home, there are a number of liquidation terms you should understand:

  • Short Sale: Nothing more than when a lender is willing to accept less than what is owed on outstanding debts against real property. A short sale is a way for a homeowner to avoid foreclosure and still be able to pay off the bank from acceptance or a settlement agreement.
  • Deed-in-lieu of Foreclosure: A cancellation of your mortgage if you voluntarily transfer title of your property to your mortgage company. Usually, you must try to sell your home for its fair market value (FMV) for at least 90 days before a mortgage company will consider this option. A deed-in-lieu of foreclosure may not be an option if there are other liens on the property, such as second mortgages, judgments from creditors, or tax liens.
  • Assumption: An assumption permits a qualified buyer to take over your mortgage debt and make the mortgage payments, even if the mortgage is non-assumable. As a result, you may be able to sell your property and avoid foreclosure.

%d bloggers like this: