Fannie Mae Launches Distressed Borrower Education Site

August 9, 2010

 

Fannie Mae launches a borrower-facing outreach site designed to educate distressed homeowners on potential retention strategies and foreclosure alternatives.

The online education resource — available in both English and Spanish — offers calculators to demonstrate to borrowers the mechanics of refinance, repayment, forbearance, and modification options if the borrowers would like to keep their home. In addition, it covers information on Fannie’s Deed-For-Lease program, which allows borrowers to become renters in the same property after pursing deed-in-lieu of foreclosure.

For borrowers who would like to leave their home, the online education resource offers possible options such as, a short sale and deed-in-lieu of foreclosure when you can no longer stay in your home but want to avoid foreclosure.

For borrowers who aren’t sure what the best option is for them, the Options Finder can assist you. By answering some questions, the Options Finder determines which option may be right based on your current situation.

When you need additional assistance, the Resources section offers the following and much more:

Fannie Mae Resources

Review what Fannie Mae is doing to assist homeowners and how they can help you.

Contact your Mortgage Company

Find and contact your mortgage company to discuss your situation.

Helpful Forms

Download forms to help you prepare for (and keep track of) working with your mortgage company or a housing counselor.

Calculators

Use the calculators to determine which scenario fits your needs.

Frequently Asked Questions

Search for helpful answers to some of the most common questions regarding your options.

Take Action – What You Should Do Next

Once you ‘ve learned about options that may be available for your situation, it’s time to take action.

Step 1: Research

Be sure to bookmark the page and print the information on the option(s) that applies best to your situation. You will want to refer to this information when speaking with your mortgage company.

Step 2: Gather

Gather the information shown below. You’ll need this information handy so you can refer to it during your discussion with your mortgage company. Use the Financial Checklist to help get organized and prepared.

  • Your mortgage(s): Loan number, past due notices, monthly statement, etc. for your first mortgage and second mortgage or other liens (if applicable).
  • Your other debts: Copies of bills and monthly statements for all other debts such as credit cards, personal loans, auto loans, utilities, etc.
  • Your income: Paystubs, unemployment benefits letter, alimony, child support, etc. for all borrowers on the mortgage.
  • Your hardship: Explain your situation and any hardship that has affected your income or ability to make your payments, etc.

Step 3: Contact

Contact your mortgage company and ask them about the options that are available for your specific situation. Also ask for the name and/or employee number of the mortgage specialist who is helping you and be sure to give them your up-to-date contact information. Use the Contact Log to keep track of your conversations and follow-up items.

Step 4: Discuss

Make sure you are ready to discuss everything about your current situation—the more the mortgage company understands and the more accurate the information, the more they can help you find the right option.

Step 5: Confirm

Ask them to confirm your current situation to be certain there are no other issues. Make sure you understand the next steps involved and if there is anything you will need to complete for the specific option.


Fannie Mae Implements Deed for Lease (D4L) Program

November 8, 2009

giving back keys

In Announcement 09-33, Fannie Mae introduces the Deed for Lease Program (D4L) under which qualifying homeowners (or their tenants) facing foreclosure will be able to remain in their homes by signing a lease in connection with the voluntary transfer of the property deed back to the lender (DIL).

“The Deed for Lease Program provides an additional option for qualifying homeowners who are facing foreclosure and are not eligible for modifications,” said Jay Ryan, Vice President of Fannie Mae. “This new program helps eliminate some of the uncertainty of foreclosure, keeps families and tenants in their homes during a transitional period, and helps to stabilize neighborhoods and communities.”

The new program is designed for borrowers who do not qualify for or have not been able to sustain other loan-workout solutions, such as a modification. Under D4L, borrowers transfer their property to the lender by completing a DIL, and then lease back the house at a market rate.

To participate in the program, borrowers must live in the home as their primary residence and must be released from any subordinate liens on the property. Tenants of borrowers in this circumstance may also be eligible for leases under the program. Borrowers or tenants interested in a lease must be able to document that the new market rental rate is no more than 31% of their gross income.

Leases under the new program may be up to 12 months, with the possibility of term renewal or month-to-month extensions after that period. A D4L property that is subsequently sold includes an assignment of the lease to the buyer.

Summary

  • With the D4L program, servicers should follow their regular process – in accordance with Fannie Mae’s workout hierarchy – in considering a borrower for a DIL.
  • If a borrower is eligible for a DIL (as determined by the servicer), the servicer should notify Fannie Mae if the borrower may also be eligible for the D4L program based on an initial screen of predetermined eligibility criteria.
  • Fannie Mae, or its designee, will take the steps necessary to further verify the property and borrower eligibility, determine the rental rate, and, if appropriate, execute the lease agreement.
  • To qualify for D4L, the occupant of the property must have the ability to pay market rent (not to exceed 31% of his or her monthly gross income).
  • The D4L agreement will be contingent on successful completion of the DIL.

Process

  • D4L includes certain responsibilities and requirements for servicers, borrowers, Fannie Mae and property managers (as designated by Fannie Mae). These are detailed in Announcement 09-33. Servicers should also refer to the Interim Instructions for Servicers document. Once automated system enhancements are in place, the automated process will replace the Interim Instructions for Servicers. Fannie Mae will notify servicers when these enhancements are available.

Documentation

Servicers must use the following documents when participating in the D4L program:


Helping Families Save Their Homes Act of 2009

May 31, 2009

savehome

On May 20, 2009, President Obama signed the Helping Families Save Their Homes Act of 2009 into law.

The Helping Families Save Their Homes Act of 2009 is an important step towards stabilizing and reforming our nation’s financial and housing markets – helping American homeowners and increasing the flow of credit during these difficult economic times.  This legislation will strengthen our nation’s housing sector and facilitate the goals of the Administration’s Making Home Affordable Program by helping millions of American homeowners stay in their homes.

Before signing the bill, President Obama said the bill “expands the reach of our existing housing plan for homeowners with FHA or USDA rural housing loans, providing them with new opportunities to modify or refinance their mortgages to more affordable levels.”

Expanding reach of Making Home Affordable to help more homeowners

The deep contraction in the economy and in the housing market has created devastating consequences for homeowners and communities throughout the country.  Since January, the Administration has made significant progress in developing and implementing a comprehensive plan for stabilizing our housing market, the centerpiece of which is the Making Home Affordable Program (MHA). By reducing foreclosures around the country, the average homeowner could see their house price bolstered by as much as $6,000 as a result of this plan, and as many as 9 million homeowners may increase the affordability of their mortgages and avoid preventable foreclosures.

Improvements to Hope for Homeowners

The legislative improvements to Hope for Homeowners included in S.896 should significantly improve the ability of borrowers to benefit from the opportunities provided by Hope for Homeowners in the context of the Administration’s housing plan.  On April 28th, the White House announced new details describing how Hope for Homeowners will be strengthened as a part of the Administration’s Making Home Affordable Program.  Incentive payments will be available for successful Hope for Homeowners refinances and loan servicers will be required to evaluate all applicants for eligibility for Hope for Homeowners as well as the Home Affordable Modification Program.

Hope for Homeowners targets help to underwater borrowers, who often face heightened risks of foreclosure, by requiring principal write downs to help homeowners increase the equity they own in their homes.  The legislative modifications to the Hope for Homeowners program included in S.896 will ease restrictions on eligibility and enable refinancing of underwater mortgages for a greater number of borrowers.

Modifications to FHA and federally guaranteed farm loans

Legislative changes to FHA and federally guaranteed farm loans will facilitate cost-neutral loan modifications for federally guaranteed rural housing loans and FHA loans.  These changes will improve the Administration’s ability to provide assistance to responsible borrowers with federally guaranteed rural housing loans and FHA loans as part of the Making Home Affordable Program.

Establishes protections for renters and living in foreclosured homes

One of the often overlooked problems in the foreclosure crisis has been the eviction of renters in good standing, through no fault of their own, from properties in foreclosure.  To address the problem of these tenants being forced out of their homes with little or no notice, this legislation will require that in the event of foreclosure, existing leases for renters are honored, except in the case of month-to-month leases or owner occupants foreclosing in which cases a minimum of 90 days notice will be required.  Parallel protections are put in place for Section 8 tenants.

Establishes right of a homeowner to know who owns their mortgage

Often mortgage loans are sold and transferred a number of times.  Borrowers often have difficulty determining who owns their loan, and who to contact with questions, problems or complaints about their loan.  This legislation requires that borrowers be informed whenever their loan is sold or transferred, so that they will always know who owns their loan.


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