Fannie Mae Will Directly Resolve Short Sale Issues

March 14, 2013

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Fannie Mae recently introduced an expanded HomePath for Short Sales tool to resolve short sale challenges. The tool, a new short sale escalation process, is open to any real estate professional working on a short sale involving a Fannie Mae-owned loan. Once a case is escalated, Fannie Mae will directly engage with the agent or servicer to address challenges such as when you are ready to list a property and need a recommended list price; you want to contest a value Fannie Mae has assigned to a listed property; you haven’t heard back from the servicer; and/or you have an issue with an offer currently under negotiation.

Contacting Fannie Mae about an Active Short Sale

A Job Aid for Real Estate Professionals

If you are a real estate professional seeking assistance with an active short sale, you have the option of escalating certain issues directly to Fannie Mae to get the answers you need.

When should you contact Fannie Mae about a short sale?

  • I’m ready to list a property and need a recommended list price.
  • I want to contest a value Fannie Mae has assigned to a listed property.
  • I submitted an offer to the servicer more than 20 days ago and have not received acknowledgement of it.
  • My request for a valuation has been pending with the servicer for more than 30 days.
  • I have not received an acceptance, rejection or counter to an offer I submitted more than 60 days ago.
  • I have an issue with an offer.
  • I have a question about a Fannie Mae policy related to short sales.

To contact Fannie Mae about a short sale:

  1. Determine if Fannie Mae owns the loan using our Loan Lookup tool.
  2. Read about what information you’ll need to provide on the checklist below.
  3. Ask your client to complete Fannie Mae’s Borrower Authorization Form.
  4. Submit your short sale issue directly at http://www.homepathforshortsales.com/hpshortsaleinquiry.html

Important Info

Know What You Need Ahead of Time
Required Information

Before you contact Fannie Mae about a short sale, make sure you have all of the information you need. The information you need depends on the request you are making. Some information is required for Fannie Mae’s dedicated short sale team to be able to help you.

After verifying Fannie Mae owns the loan, Fannie Mae will need your contact information (listing agent name, agency name, phone number, and email), the Fannie Mae and/or servicer loan number, and a completed Fannie Mae Borrower Authorization Form, which you will need to upload when you begin the process.

In addition to this information, here’s what Fannie Mae will ask you for when you inquire about an active short sale. *Note that the information marked with an asterisk is required*

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Fannie Mae Launches Distressed Borrower Education Site

August 9, 2010

 

Fannie Mae launches a borrower-facing outreach site designed to educate distressed homeowners on potential retention strategies and foreclosure alternatives.

The online education resource — available in both English and Spanish — offers calculators to demonstrate to borrowers the mechanics of refinance, repayment, forbearance, and modification options if the borrowers would like to keep their home. In addition, it covers information on Fannie’s Deed-For-Lease program, which allows borrowers to become renters in the same property after pursing deed-in-lieu of foreclosure.

For borrowers who would like to leave their home, the online education resource offers possible options such as, a short sale and deed-in-lieu of foreclosure when you can no longer stay in your home but want to avoid foreclosure.

For borrowers who aren’t sure what the best option is for them, the Options Finder can assist you. By answering some questions, the Options Finder determines which option may be right based on your current situation.

When you need additional assistance, the Resources section offers the following and much more:

Fannie Mae Resources

Review what Fannie Mae is doing to assist homeowners and how they can help you.

Contact your Mortgage Company

Find and contact your mortgage company to discuss your situation.

Helpful Forms

Download forms to help you prepare for (and keep track of) working with your mortgage company or a housing counselor.

Calculators

Use the calculators to determine which scenario fits your needs.

Frequently Asked Questions

Search for helpful answers to some of the most common questions regarding your options.

Take Action – What You Should Do Next

Once you ‘ve learned about options that may be available for your situation, it’s time to take action.

Step 1: Research

Be sure to bookmark the page and print the information on the option(s) that applies best to your situation. You will want to refer to this information when speaking with your mortgage company.

Step 2: Gather

Gather the information shown below. You’ll need this information handy so you can refer to it during your discussion with your mortgage company. Use the Financial Checklist to help get organized and prepared.

  • Your mortgage(s): Loan number, past due notices, monthly statement, etc. for your first mortgage and second mortgage or other liens (if applicable).
  • Your other debts: Copies of bills and monthly statements for all other debts such as credit cards, personal loans, auto loans, utilities, etc.
  • Your income: Paystubs, unemployment benefits letter, alimony, child support, etc. for all borrowers on the mortgage.
  • Your hardship: Explain your situation and any hardship that has affected your income or ability to make your payments, etc.

Step 3: Contact

Contact your mortgage company and ask them about the options that are available for your specific situation. Also ask for the name and/or employee number of the mortgage specialist who is helping you and be sure to give them your up-to-date contact information. Use the Contact Log to keep track of your conversations and follow-up items.

Step 4: Discuss

Make sure you are ready to discuss everything about your current situation—the more the mortgage company understands and the more accurate the information, the more they can help you find the right option.

Step 5: Confirm

Ask them to confirm your current situation to be certain there are no other issues. Make sure you understand the next steps involved and if there is anything you will need to complete for the specific option.


HAMP 2nd Lien Modification Program (2MP)

June 16, 2010

 

***UPDATE:  Click HERE to view a 30-minute self-guided tutorial that provides an overview of the Second Lien Modification Program (2MP) for servicers of non-Government Sponsored Entities (GSE) loans.***

Note: If you are having a problem accessing the tutorial, email me at lauren@lossmitigationmasters.com

Many homeowners may be struggling to make their monthly mortgage payments because they have a second lien.  Even when a first mortgage payment is affordable, the addition of a second lien can sometimes increase monthly payments beyond affordable levels.  Second liens often complicate or prevent modification or refinancing of a first mortgage.

The 2nd Lien Modification Program (2MP) offers homeowners a way to lower payments on their second mortgage.  2MP offers homeowners, their mortgage servicers, and investors an incentive for modifying a second lien.  Servicers and investors may also receive an incentive for extinguishing a second lien, forgiving all of the debt a homeowner owes.

Homeowners must provide consent to share their first lien mortgage modification information with their second lien mortgage servicer, if they are different. Since 2MP is meant to be complementary to the Home Affordable Modification Program (HAMP), a homeowner must have their first lien modified through HAMP before the second lien can be modified under 2MP.

Under 2MP, with their investor’s guidance, a mortgage servicer may:

  • Reduce the interest rate to 1% for second liens that pay both principal and interest (amortizing)
  • Reduce the interest rate to 1% amortizing or 2% interest-only for interest-only second liens
  • Extend the term of the second lien to 40 years
  • If the principal was deferred (through forbearance) or forgiven on the first lien, a servicer must forbear the same proportion on the second lien; although a servicer may, in its discretion, forgive any portion or all of the second lien and receive incentives for doing so

A second lien is eligible for 2MP if:

  • the corresponding first lien has been modified under the Obama Administration’s HAMP and the second lien servicer is participating
  • it was originated on or before January 1, 2009
  • it does not have an unpaid principal balance (at consideration for the modification) of less than $5,000 or a pre-modification scheduled monthly payment of less than $100
  • it has not yet been modified under 2MP
  • it is not subordinate to a second lien or is not a home equity loan in first lien position
  • it is not a second lien on which no interest is charged and no payments are due until the first lien is paid in full
  • the second lien servicer is in possession of a fully executed 2MP modification agreement or trial period plan by December 31, 2012; or the second lien is not insured, guaranteed, or held by a Federal government agency (e.g. FHA, HUD, VA, and Rural Development)

Examples

Family A: Amortizing Second Mortgage

In 2006: Family A took out a 30-year closed-end second mortgage with a balance of $45,000 and an interest rate of 8.6%.

Today: Family A has an unpaid balance of almost $44,000 on their second mortgage.

Under the 2MP: The interest rate on Family A’s second mortgage will be reduced to 1% for 5 years. This will reduce their annual payments by over $2,300.

After those five years, Family A’s mortgage payment will rise again but to a more moderate level.

                                                 Existing Mortgage Loan Modification
Balance $43,942 $43,942
Remaining Years 27 27
Interest Rate 8.6% 1.0%
Monthly Payment $349.48 $154.81
Savings $195 per month, $2,336 per year for five years

Family B: Interest-Only Second Mortgage

In 2006: Family B took out an interest-only second mortgage with a balance of $60,000, an interest rate of 4.4%, and a term of 15 years.

Today: Family B has $60,000 remaining on their interest-only second mortgage because none of the principal was paid down.

Under the 2MP: The interest rate on Family B’s interest-only second mortgage will be reduced to 2% for 5 years. This will reduce their annual interest payments by $1,440.

After those five years, Family B’s mortgage payment will adjust back up and the mortgage will amortize over a term equal to the longer of (i) the remaining term of the family’s modified first mortgage (e.g. 27 years if the first mortgage had a 30 year term at origination and was three years old at the time of modification) or (ii) the originally scheduled amortization term of the second mortgage.

                                                Existing Mortgage Loan Modification
Balance $60,000 $60,000
Remaining Years 12 27 (term reset to the remaining term of the modified first loan)
Interest Rate 4.4% 2.0%
Monthly Interest Payments $220 $100
Savings $120 per month, $1,440 per year for five years

List of Participating Servicers

  • Bank of America (including Countrywide)
  • Citi Mortgage, Inc.
  • Chase (including EMC and WaMu)
  • Wells Fargo (including Wachovia)
  • BayView Loan Servicing, LLC
  • Servis One dba BSI Financial Services
  • iServe Servicing, Inc.

More servicers will be added in the near future as they join the program.

For more information, contact your mortgage servicer.



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