Fannie Mae Will Directly Resolve Short Sale Issues

March 14, 2013

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Fannie Mae recently introduced an expanded HomePath for Short Sales tool to resolve short sale challenges. The tool, a new short sale escalation process, is open to any real estate professional working on a short sale involving a Fannie Mae-owned loan. Once a case is escalated, Fannie Mae will directly engage with the agent or servicer to address challenges such as when you are ready to list a property and need a recommended list price; you want to contest a value Fannie Mae has assigned to a listed property; you haven’t heard back from the servicer; and/or you have an issue with an offer currently under negotiation.

Contacting Fannie Mae about an Active Short Sale

A Job Aid for Real Estate Professionals

If you are a real estate professional seeking assistance with an active short sale, you have the option of escalating certain issues directly to Fannie Mae to get the answers you need.

When should you contact Fannie Mae about a short sale?

  • I’m ready to list a property and need a recommended list price.
  • I want to contest a value Fannie Mae has assigned to a listed property.
  • I submitted an offer to the servicer more than 20 days ago and have not received acknowledgement of it.
  • My request for a valuation has been pending with the servicer for more than 30 days.
  • I have not received an acceptance, rejection or counter to an offer I submitted more than 60 days ago.
  • I have an issue with an offer.
  • I have a question about a Fannie Mae policy related to short sales.

To contact Fannie Mae about a short sale:

  1. Determine if Fannie Mae owns the loan using our Loan Lookup tool.
  2. Read about what information you’ll need to provide on the checklist below.
  3. Ask your client to complete Fannie Mae’s Borrower Authorization Form.
  4. Submit your short sale issue directly at http://www.homepathforshortsales.com/hpshortsaleinquiry.html

Important Info

Know What You Need Ahead of Time
Required Information

Before you contact Fannie Mae about a short sale, make sure you have all of the information you need. The information you need depends on the request you are making. Some information is required for Fannie Mae’s dedicated short sale team to be able to help you.

After verifying Fannie Mae owns the loan, Fannie Mae will need your contact information (listing agent name, agency name, phone number, and email), the Fannie Mae and/or servicer loan number, and a completed Fannie Mae Borrower Authorization Form, which you will need to upload when you begin the process.

In addition to this information, here’s what Fannie Mae will ask you for when you inquire about an active short sale. *Note that the information marked with an asterisk is required*

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Details on HUD Emergency Homeowners Loan Program

October 14, 2010


On October 5, 2010, HUD released details about the $1 Billion Emergency Homeowners Loan Program (EHLP) authorized by the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act.

EHLP will offer declining balance, deferred payment “bridge loan” (non-recourse, subordinate loans with 0% interest rate) for up to $50,000 to assist eligible homeowners with payments of arrearages, including delinquent taxes and insurance plus up to 24 months of monthly payments on their mortgage principal, interest, mortgage insurance premiums, taxes, and hazard insurance.

Borrowers living in the following jurisdictions are eligible to receive funds through the EHLP:

TX Texas $ 135,418,959
NY New York $ 111,649,112
PA Pennsylvania $ 105,804,905
MA Massachusetts $  61,036,001
WA Washington $  56,272,599
MN Minnesota $  55,848,137
WI Wisconsin $   51,540,638
MO Missouri $   49,001,729
VA Virginia $   46,627,889
CO Colorado $   41,286,747
MD Maryland $   39,962,270
CT Connecticut $   32,946,864
KS Kansas $   17,748,782
AR Arkansas $   17,736,991
IA Iowa $   17,379,343
LA Louisiana $   16,691,558
UT Utah $   16,577,582
OK Oklahoma $   15,575,381
PR Puerto Rico $   14,714,668
ID Idaho $   13,284,075
NH New Hampshire $   12,655,243
NM New Mexico $   10,725,515
ME Maine $   10,379,657
WV West Virginia $     8,339,884
NE Nebraska $     8,304,512
HI Hawaii $     6,292,250
DE Delaware $     6,048,577
MT Montana $     5,710,580
VT Vermont $     4,830,215
AK Alaska $     3,890,898
WY Wyoming $     2,346,329
SD South Dakota $     2,051,563
ND North Dakota $     1,320,547
Total: $ 1,000,000,000

Program Administration

Delegated Approach: Borrowers who are listed in one of the above 32 states or Puerto Rico will meet with non-profit housing counselors who are part of the National Foreclosure Mitigation Counseling Program administered by NeighborWorks® America to receive funding.

The non-profit housing counselors will provide intake and outreach services including:

  • (i) developing and disseminating program marketing materials, (ii) providing an overview of the program and eligibility requirements, (iii) conducting initial eligibility screening (including verifying income), (iv) counseling  potential applicants, providing information concerning available employment and training resources,  (v) collecting and assembling homeowner documentation, (vi) submitting homeowner application, and (vii) providing transition counseling to explore with the homeowner other loss mitigation options, including loan modification, short sale, deed-in-lieu of foreclosure, or traditional sale of home.
  • The counselors shall also be encouraged to conduct outreach to entities in local communities to provide information on assistance available to unemployed homeowners through this program and shall publicize the list of entities approved to assist potential applicants with applying to the program

State Law Approach: Borrowers or state HFAs that operate loan assistance programs that are determined by HUD to be substantially similar to the EHRF program will receive allocations to fund emergency loans for borrowers in the states below:

Alabama $60,672,471
California $476,257,070
Florida $238,864,755
Georgia $126,650,987
Illinois $166,352,726
Indiana $82,762,859
Kentucky $55,588,050
Michigan $128,461,559
Mississippi $38,036,950
Nevada $34,056,581
New Jersey $112,200,638
North Carolina $120,874,221
Ohio $148,728,864
Oregon $49,294,215
Rhode Island $13,570,770
South Carolina $58,772,347
Tennessee $81,128,260
Washington, DC $7,726,678

Allocation of Program Funds

Recipient Geography: HUD will assist borrowers living in Puerto Rico and the 32 states otherwise not funded by Treasury’s Innovation Fund for Hardest Hit Housing Markets (Hardest Hit Fund) program.

Allocation Amount: The total amount reserved will be based on the state’s approximate share of unemployed homeowners with a mortgage relative to all unemployed homeowners with a mortgage

Targeting Funds to Local Geographies: HUD will provide information that identifies pockets within each of the designated states that have suffered the most from recent spikes in unemployment and/or mortgage delinquencies.  HUD will encourage the use of program dollars in these hardest-hit areas.

Homeowner Eligibility and Program Operation

Income Thresholds: Has a total pre-event household income equal to, or less than, 120% of the Area Median Income (AMI), which includes wage, salary, and self-employed earnings and income.

Significant Income Reduction: Has a current gross income (income before taxes) that is at least 15% lower than the pre-event income.

  • “Pre-event income”: the income prior to the onset of unemployment, underemployment, or medical emergency
  • “Current income”: the income at the time of program application, as well as income during the period that the homeowner continues to receive assistance from the fund

Employment type: Both wage and salary workers and self-employed individuals are eligible.

Delinquency and Likelihood of Foreclosure: Must be at least 3 months delinquent on payments and have received notification of an intention to foreclose.  This requirement can be documented by any written communication from the mortgagee to the homeowner indicating at least 3 months of missed payments and the mortgagee’s intent to foreclose.  In addition, the homeowner can self-certify that there is a likelihood of initiation of foreclosure on the part of their mortgagee due to the homeowner being at least 3 months delinquent in their monthly payment.

Ability to Resume Repayment: Has a reasonable likelihood of being able to resume repayment of the first mortgage obligations within 2 years, and meet other housing expenses and debt obligations when the household regains full employment, as determined by:

Back-end DTI ratio:

Total Monthly Debt Expenses ÷ Total Gross Monthly Income

  • Total monthly debt expenses = mortgage principal, interest, taxes, insurance, & revolving and fixed installment debt

***Note: For this calculation, gross income will be measured at the “pre-event” level***

Principal Residence: Must reside in the mortgaged property and be your  principal residence.  The mortgaged property must also be a single family residence (1 – 4 unit structure or condominium unit).

Creation of HUD Note:  After the first assistance payment is made on behalf of the homeowner, the fiscal agent will create an open-ended “HUD note” and a mortgage to be  in the name of the Secretary HUD of sufficient size to accommodate the expected amount of assistance to be provided to homeowner.

Ongoing Qualification of Homeowner

Termination of Monthly Assistance: Assistance is terminated and the homeowner resumes full responsibility for meeting the first lien mortgage payments in the event of any of the following circumstances:

  • The maximum loan ($50,000) amount has been reached;
  • The homeowner fails to report changes in unemployment status or income;
  • The homeowner’s income regains 85% or more of its pre-event level;
  • The homeowner no longer resides in, sells, or refinances the debt on the mortgaged property; or
  • The homeowner defaults on their portion of the current first lien mortgage loan payments

Income re-evaluation: After initial income verification at application intake, the homeowner shall be required to notify the fiscal agent of any changes in the household income and/or employment status at any point throughout the entire period of assistance

Forms of Assistance

Use of Funds for Arrearages: On behalf of the homeowner, the fiscal agent shall use loan funds to pay 100% of arrears (mortgage principal, interest, mortgage insurance premiums, taxes, hazard insurance, and ground rent, if any)

Homeowner Payments: Homeowner contribution to monthly payment on first mortgage will be set at 31% of gross income at the time of application, but in no instance will it be less than $25 per month

Use of Funds for Continuing Mortgage Assistance: The fiscal agent will make monthly mortgage payments to the servicer of the first lien mortgage in excess of the payments made by the homeowner

Duration of Assistance: If at any time the household’s gross income increases to 85% or more of its pre-event level, assistance will be phased out by the fiscal agent over a 2 month period.  In any event, assistance with monthly payments may not continue beyond 24 months

Repayment Terms

Transition Counseling:   The designated counseling agent shall contact each homeowner that is approaching the last months of program eligibility and remains un/underemployed (3-6 months before the assistance ends) and require the homeowner  to meet with a HUD approved counseling agent to explore other loss mitigation options, including loan modification, short sales, deed-in-lieu of foreclosure, or traditional sale of home

Repayment of HUD Note: Following the last payment on behalf of the homeowner, the fiscal agent will process the homeowner’s “HUD Note” and record a mortgage with a specific loan balance.  The note and mortgage will be in the form of a 5 year declining balance, 0% interest, non-recourse loan, and the mortgage shall be in the form of a secured junior lien on the property

Terms for Declining Balance Feature:  No payment is due on the note during the 5 year term so long as the assisted household maintains the property as principal residence and remains current in his or her monthly payments on the first mortgage loan.  If the homeowner meets these two conditions, the balance due shall decline by 20% annually, until the note is extinguished and the junior loan is terminated

Events Triggering Note Repayment: The homeowner will be responsible for repayment of the applicable balance of the HUD note to the fiscal agent or its successor,  if, at any time during the 5 year repayment period, any of the following events occur:

  • The homeowner no longer resides in the mortgaged property as a principal residence, but maintains ownership;
  • The homeowner defaults on its portion of  the current mortgage; or
  • The homeowner receives net proceeds from selling or refinancing debt on the home.

***Note: Net proceeds — after paying outstanding applicable brokers fees, first balances (and second lien balances, as applicable), and an allowance of $2,000 to the homeowner for relocation expenses when the home is sold — will go towards paying down the HUD note.  In the event that proceeds of a sale or loan refinance are not sufficient to repay the entire HUD note, the remaining applicable balance of the HUD note shall be considered to have been met, and the lien against the property shall be released***

Provisions for Underwater Homeowners: At all stages of the program, “underwater” homeowners will be encouraged to explore participation in short sale or short refinancing programs offered by their servicer and/or the federal government (i.e. Home Affordable Foreclosure Alternatives), which will not trigger repayment of the HUD note

  • Underwater homeowners = homeowners with mortgage debt in excess of the market value of their home

Program Start Date

HUD intends for EHLP to begin taking applications by the end of 2010


$3 billion additional assistance for jobless homeowners

August 17, 2010

On August 11, 2010, the Obama Administration announced additional support to help homeowners struggling with unemployment through two targeted foreclosure-prevention programs.

Through the existing Housing Finance Agency (HFA) Innovation Fund for the Hardest Hit Housing Markets (HFA Hardest Hit Fund), the U.S. Department of the Treasury will make $2 billion of additional assistance available for HFA programs for homeowners struggling to make their mortgage payments due to unemployment. Additionally, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) will soon launch a complementary $1 billion Emergency Homeowners Loan Program to provide assistance – for up to 24 months – to homeowners who are at risk of foreclosure and have experienced a substantial reduction in income due to involuntary unemployment, underemployment, or a medical condition.

“HUD’s new Emergency Homeowner Loan Program will build on Treasury’s Hardest Hit initiative by targeting assistance to struggling unemployed homeowners in other hard hit areas to help them avoid preventable foreclosures,” said Bill Apgar, HUD Senior Advisor for Mortgage Finance. Together, these initiatives represent a combined $3 billion investment that will ultimately impact a broad group of struggling borrowers across the country and in doing so further contribute to the Administration’s efforts to stabilize housing markets and communities across the country.”

Hardest Hit Fund

President Obama first announced the HFA Hardest Hit Fund in February 2010 to allow states hit hard by the economic downturn flexibility in determining how to design and implement programs to meet the local challenges homeowners in their state are facing.

Under the additional assistance announced, states eligible to receive support have all experienced an unemployment rate at or above the national average over the past 12 months. Each state will use the funds for targeted unemployment programs that provide temporary assistance to eligible homeowners to help them pay their mortgage while they seek re-employment, additional employment or undertake job training.

States that have already benefited from previously announced assistance under the HFA Hardest Hit Fund may use these additional resources to support the unemployment programs previously approved by Treasury or they may opt to implement a new unemployment program. States that do not currently have HFA Hardest Hit Fund unemployment programs must submit proposals to Treasury by September 1, 2010 that, within established guidelines, meet the distinct needs of their state.

The states eligible to receive funds through this additional assistance, along with allocations based on their population sizes, are as follows:

Alabama $60,672,471
California $476,257,070
Florida $238,864,755
Georgia $126,650,987
Illinois $166,352,726
Indiana $82,762,859
Kentucky $55,588,050
Michigan $128,461,559
Mississippi $38,036,950
Nevada $34,056,581
New Jersey $112,200,638
North Carolina $120,874,221
Ohio $148,728,864
Oregon $49,294,215
Rhode Island $13,570,770
South Carolina $58,772,347
Tennessee $81,128,260
Washington, DC $7,726,678

HUD Emergency Homeowners Loan Program

This new program will complement Treasury’s HFA Hardest Hit Fund by providing assistance to homeowners in hard hit local areas that may not be included in the hardest hit target states. Those areas are still being determined.

The program will work through a variety of state and non-profit entities and will offer:

  • a declining balance
  • deferred payment “bridge loan” (0% interest, non-recourse, subordinate loan) for up to $50,000 on their mortgage principal, interest, mortgage insurance, taxes and hazard insurance for up to 24 months.

Under the program, eligible borrowers must:

  • Be at least 3 months delinquent in their payments and have a reasonable likelihood of being able to resume repayment of their mortgage payments and related housing expenses within 2 years;
  • Have a mortgage property that is the principal residence of the borrower, and eligible borrowers may not own a second home;
  • Demonstrate a good payment record prior to the event that produced the reduction of income.

HUD will announce additional details, including the targeted communities and other program specifics when the program is officially launched in the coming weeks.


Fannie Mae Relaxes Waiting Period for Buying a New Home After a Short Sale

May 3, 2010

 

In Announcement SEL-2010-05, Fannie Mae updated several policies regarding the future eligibility of borrowers to obtain a new mortgage loan after experiencing a preforeclosure event (preforeclosure sale, short sale, or deed-in-lieu of foreclosure).

The “waiting period” – the amount of time that must elapse after the preforeclosure event – is changing and may be dependent on the loan-to-value (LTV) ratio for the transaction and whether extenuating circumstances contributed to the borrower’s financial hardship (for example, loss of employment). In addition, Fannie Mae is updating the requirements for determining that borrowers have re-established their credit after a significant derogatory credit event.

***Note:  The terms “short sale” and “preforeclosure sale” both referenced in the Announcement have the same meaning – the sale of a property in lieu of a foreclosure, resulting in a payoff of less than the total amount owed, which was pre-approved by the servicer.***

Waiting Period After a Preforeclosure Sale, Short Sale, or Deed-in-Lieu of Foreclosure

Fannie Mae is changing the required waiting period for a borrower to be eligible for a mortgage loan after a preforeclosure event. The waiting period commences on the completion date of the preforeclosure event, and may vary based on the maximum allowable LTV ratios.

Preforeclosure Event Current Waiting Period Requirements New Waiting Period Requirements(1)
 Deed-in-Lieu of Foreclosure 4 years  2 years – 80% maximum LTV ratios,  4 years – 90% maximum LTV ratios,  7 years – LTV ratios per the Eligibility Matrix
 Short Sale  2 years

 

Exceptions to Waiting Period for Extenuating Circumstances
Preforeclosure Event Current Waiting Period Requirements New Waiting Period Requirements (1)
 Deed-in-Lieu of Foreclosure 2 years      Additional requirements apply after 2 years up to 7 years  2 years – 90% maximum LTV ratios
 Short Sale  No exceptions are permitted to the 2-year waiting period

 (1) The maximum LTV ratios permitted are the lesser of the LTV ratios in this table or the maximum LTV ratios for the transaction per the Eligibility Matrix.

Bankruptcies

The multiple bankruptcy policy is being clarified to state that 2 or more borrowers with individual bankruptcies are not cumulative. For example, if the borrower has one bankruptcy and the co-borrower has one bankruptcy, this is not considered a multiple bankruptcy. The current waiting periods for bankruptcies remain unchanged.

Effective Date

This policy is effective for beginning July 1, 2010.

Requirements for Re-Establishing Credit

The requirements for borrowers to re-establish their credit after a significant derogatory event are also being updated. Fannie Mae is replacing the requirements related to the number of credit references and applicable payment histories with the waiting periods and other criteria.

After a bankruptcy, foreclosure, deed-in-lieu of foreclosure, or preforeclosure or short sale, the borrower’s credit will be considered re-established if all of the following are met:

  • The waiting period and the related requirements are met.
  • The loan meets the minimum credit score requirements based on the parameters of the loan and the established eligibility requirements.

The “Catch”?

Now to qualify after that 2 year period, the new regulations state that a minimum 20% down payment will be required; 10% for a down payment, the wait will revert to the 4 year minimum; less than 10% for a down payment, the wait could be even longer — UNLESS there are “extenuating circumstances” such as job loss, health problems, divorce, etc…

But doesn’t pretty much any short sale by default involve “extenuating circumstances”? Just show them the hardship letter you submitted with your short sale docs. Case closed.

Why This Matters?

So why does this matter, and how should you, as distressed homeowners, USE this information?

Well for starters, if you couple this with the Obama administration’s new short sale assistance program (where mortgage servicing companies are paid $1,000 to handle successful short sales and mortgage holders get $1,500 for signing over their property), you’ve now got more compelling reasons than ever to pursue a short sale rather than just throwing up your hands and “letting things go”.


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